Paris Tourist Attractions

Paris Tourist Attractions

Paris France’s capital, is a major European city and a global center for art, fashion, gastronomy and culture. Its 19th-century cityscape is crisscrossed by wide boulevards and the River Seine. Beyond such landmarks as the Eiffel Tower and the 12th-century, Gothic Notre-Dame cathedral, the city is known for its cafe culture and designer boutiques along the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré.

Paris is a major railway, highway, and air-transport hub served by two international airports: Paris–Charles de Gaulle (the second-busiest airport in Europe) and Paris–Orly. Opened in 1900, the city’s subway system, the Paris Métro, serves 5.23 million passengers daily; it is the second-busiest metro system in Europe after the Moscow Metro. Gare du Nord is the 24th-busiest railway station in the world and the busiest located outside Japan, with 262 million passengers in 2015. Paris is especially known for its museums and architectural landmarks: the Louvre received 2.8 million visitors in 2021, despite the long museum closings caused by the COVID-19 virus. The Musée d’Orsay, Musée Marmottan Monet and Musée de l’Orangerie are noted for their collections of French Impressionist art. The Pompidou Centre Musée National d’Art Moderne has the largest collection of modern and contemporary art in Europe and Musée Rodin and Musée Picasso. The historical district along the Seine in the city centre has been classified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1991; popular landmarks there include the Cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris on the Île de la Cité, now closed for renovation after the 15 April 2019 fire. Other popular tourist sites include the Gothic royal chapel of Sainte-Chapelle, also on the Île de la Cité; the Eiffel Tower, constructed for the Paris Universal Exposition of 1889; the Grand Palais and Petit Palais, built for the Paris Universal Exposition of 1900; the Arc de Triomphe on the Champs-Élysées, and the hill of Montmartre with its artistic history and its Basilica of Sacré-Coeur.

 

1.Eiffel Tower

Eiffel Tower

Locally nicknamed “La dame de fer” (French for “Iron Lady”), it was constructed from 1887 to 1889 as the centerpiece of the 1889 World’s Fair. Although initially criticised by some of France’s leading artists and intellectuals for its design, it has since become a global cultural icon of France and one of the most recognisable structures in the world. The Eiffel Tower is the most visited monument with an entrance fee in the world: 6.91 million people ascended it in 2015. It was designated a monument historique in 1964, and was named part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site (“Paris, Banks of the Seine”) in 1991.

The tower is 330 metres (1,083 ft) tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building, and the tallest structure in Paris. Its base is square, measuring 125 metres (410 ft) on each side. During its construction, the Eiffel Tower surpassed the Washington Monument to become the tallest human-made structure in the world, a title it held for 41 years until the Chrysler Building in New York City was finished in 1930. It was the first structure in the world to surpass both the 200-metre and 300-metre mark in height. Due to the addition of a broadcasting aerial at the top of the tower in 1957, it is now taller than the Chrysler Building by 5.2 metres (17 ft). Excluding transmitters, the Eiffel Tower is the second tallest free-standing structure in France after the Millau Viaduct.

 

2.Musée du Louvre

Musée du Louvre

The Louvre, or the Louvre Museum, is the world’s most-visited museum, and an historic landmark in Paris, France. It is the home of some of the best-known works of art, including the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo.

Musée du LouvreA sumptuous palace that was once the home of France’s kings, the Louvre is the most important of Paris’ top museums. Visitors enter the museum in the courtyard of the palace at the Pyramid du Louvre, the glass pyramid designed by Ieoh Ming Pei in 1917. The Musée du Louvre displays thousands of artworks, many of which are considered masterpieces, from antiquities to European paintings of the 15th to 19th centuries.

It is impossible to see it all in one visit, but tourists can focus on a particular gallery, such as classical sculpture, Italian Renaissance art, or 17th-century French paintings, or take a self-guided tour to cover the Louvre Museum’s highlights.

Le Louvre possède une longue histoire de conservation artistique et historique, depuis l’Ancien Régime jusqu’à nos jours. À la suite du départ de Louis XIV pour le château de Versailles à la fin du XVIIe siècle, on y entrepose une partie des collections royales de tableaux et de sculptures antiques. Après avoir durant un siècle hébergé plusieurs académies dont celle de peinture et de sculpture, ainsi que divers artistes logés par le roi, l’ancien palais royal est véritablement transformé sous la Révolution en « Muséum central des arts de la République ». Il ouvre en 1793 en exposant environ 660 œuvres, essentiellement issues des collections royales ou confisquées chez des nobles émigrés ou dans des églises. Par la suite les collections ne cesseront de s’enrichir par des prises de guerre, acquisitions, mécénats, legs, donations, et découvertes archéologiques.

Le musée compte pour sa gestion 2 091 employés (fonctionnaires, contractuels et vacataires), dont 1 232 agents de surveillance, un garde pour chacune des 403 salles d’exposition, que complètent les effectifs affectés aux 900 caméras du système de télésurveillance.

 

3.Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris

Notre-Dame de Paris, referred to simply as Notre-Dame, is a medieval Catholic cathedral on the Île de la Cité, in the 4th arrondissement of Paris. The cathedral, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, is considered one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture.

Notre-Dame stands in the heart of Paris on the Île-de-la-Cité next to the Latin Quarter. An island in the Seine River, the Île-de-la-Cité is the historical and geographical center of Paris. On this small plot of land, the Romans built the Gallo-Roman city of Lutetia, and from the 6th century to the 14th century, the Kings of France resided here.

The Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris was founded in 1163 by King Louis IX (Saint Louis) and Bishop Maurice de Sully, and the construction took more than 150 years. The cathedral was first created in Early Gothic style, while later additions (the west front and the nave) show the transition to High Gothic style.

This impressive medieval monument is a triumph of Gothic architecture. The ornately decorated facade creates a breathtaking impression with its profusion of sculptures and gargoyles, while elaborate flying buttresses provide structural integrity for the enormous building.

Construction of the cathedral began in 1163 under Bishop Maurice de Sully and was largely completed by 1260, though it was modified frequently in the centuries that followed. In the 1790s, during the French Revolution, Notre-Dame suffered extensive desecration; much of its religious imagery was damaged or destroyed. In the 19th century, the coronation of Napoleon I and the funerals of many of the French Republic’s presidents took place at the cathedral.

The 1831 publication of Victor Hugo’s novel Notre-Dame de Paris (known in English as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame) inspired popular interest in the cathedral, which led to a major restoration project between 1844 and 1864, supervised by Eugène Viollet-le-Duc. On August 26, 1944, the Liberation of Paris from German occupation was celebrated in Notre-Dame with the singing of the Magnificat. Beginning in 1963, the cathedral’s façade was cleaned of centuries of soot and grime. Another cleaning and restoration project was carried out between 1991 and 2000.

 

4.Avenue des Champs-Élysées

Avenue des Champs-Élysées

The Avenue des Champs-Élysées is an avenue in the 8th arrondissement of Paris, France, 1.9 kilometres long and 70 metres wide, running between the Place de la Concorde in the east and the Place Charles de Gaulle in the west, where the Arc de Triomphe is located.

The most monumental boulevard in Paris used to be a desolate field of marshland until the 17th century, when it was landscaped by André Le Nôtre. A century later, the Parisian city planner Baron Haussmann designed the boulevard’s elegant buildings.

The Champs-Élysées is divided into two parts with the Rond-Point des Champs-Élysées as its intersection.

The lower part of the Champs-Élysées, bordering the Place de la Concorde, includes a spacious park, the Jardins des Champs-Élysées, and the Petit Palais fine arts museum. The upper part, extending to the Arc de Triomphe, is lined by luxury shops, hotels, restaurants, cafés, cinemas, and theaters. This bustling area draws many tourists and is a gathering place for Parisians.

De avenue is 1910 meter lang, en loopt door het 8e arrondissement in het noordwesten van Parijs, vanaf de Place de la Concorde met de bekende obelisk in het oosten tot aan de Place Charles de Gaulle (de voormalige Place de l’Étoile) met de Arc de Triomphe in het westen. De Champs-Élysées maakt deel uit van de Axe historique. De oostzijde van de trekpleister wordt begrensd door volle groene bomen en gebouwen als het Théâtre Marigny en het Grand Palais (met daarbinnen het Palais de la Découverte). Het Élysée ligt iets noordelijker, niet aan de avenue zelf. Verder naar het westen ligt de nadruk op bioscopen, theaters, cafés en restaurants (waarvan Fouquet’s het bekendste is).

Trekt men de laan verder door, dan vindt men in het oosten de Place de la Concorde, de Jardin des Tuileries, de Place du Carrousel (waar een kleine triomfboog staat, de Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel) en het Louvre. Aan de westkant zet de laan zich voort via de Place Charles de Gaulle (met de grote Arc de Triomphe), de Avenue de la Grande Armée, de Porte Maillot, de Avenue Charles de Gaulle, en op de linkeroever, in de wijk La Défense, de Esplanade du Général de Gaulle met de moderne Grande Arche. Het geheel is bijna 2 km lang.

 

5.Musée d’Orsay

Musée d'Orsay

The Musée d’Orsay is a museum in Paris, France, on the Left Bank of the Seine. It is housed in the former Gare d’Orsay, a Beaux-Arts railway station built between 1898 and 1900. The museum holds mainly French art dating from 1848 to 1914, including paintings, sculptures, furniture, and photography.

The Musée d’Orsay displays a splendid collection of 19th- and 20th-century art (created from 1848 to 1914) in the converted Gare d’Orsay. This Belle Epoque railway station was built for the Universal Exhibition of 1900.

Some of the world’s most cherished paintings are on display in the museum’s spacious galleries. The Orsay Museum is among the best places to visit in Paris to get an overview of Impressionist art history. Visitors are delighted by the broad assortment of paintings, from canvases that reveal the gentle pastel-hued brush strokes of Monet to the wild, colorful scenes of Gauguin.

Situé dans le 7e arrondissement de Paris le long de la rive gauche de la Seine, en surplomb de la promenade Édouard-Glissant, il est installé dans l’ancienne gare d’Orsay, construite par Victor Laloux de 1898 à 1900 et réaménagée en musée sur décision du président de la République Valéry Giscard d’Estaing. Ses collections présentent l’art occidental de 1848 à 1914, dans toute sa diversité : peinture, sculpture, arts décoratifs, art graphique, photographie, architecture, etc. Il est l’un des plus grands musées d’Europe pour cette période.

Le musée possède la plus importante collection de peintures impressionnistes et postimpressionnistes au monde, avec près de 1 100 toiles3 au total sur plus de 3 650 en sa possession. Le public peut y voir des chefs-d’œuvre de la peinture et de la sculpture comme Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe et l’Olympia d’Édouard Manet, une épreuve de La Petite Danseuse de quatorze ans de Degas, L’Origine du monde, Un enterrement à Ornans, L’Atelier du peintre de Courbet, Les Joueurs de cartes de Cézanne ou encore cinq tableaux de la Série des Cathédrales de Rouen de Monet et Bal du moulin de la Galette de Renoir.

Des expositions temporaires monographiques ou thématiques concernant périodiquement l’œuvre d’un artiste, un courant ou une question d’histoire de l’art sont souvent mises en place. Un auditorium accueille des manifestations diversifiées, concerts, cinéma, théâtre d’ombres, conférences et colloques et des spectacles spécifiquement destinés à un jeune public.

 

6.Arc de Triomphe

Arc de Triomphe

The Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile is one of the most famous monuments in Paris, France, standing at the western end of the Champs-Élysées at the centre of Place Charles de Gaulle, formerly named Place de l’Étoile—the étoile or “star” of the juncture formed by its twelve radiating avenues.

The Arc de Triomphe is dedicated to the soldiers who fought in the French armies of the Revolution and the First Empire (Napoleonic Wars). Napoleon commissioned the building of this mighty structure in 1806 but did not live to see its completion in 1836.

Designed by architect Jean-François Chalgrin, who modeled the monument after the Arch of Titus in Rome, the massive 50-meter-high arch features bas-reliefs with larger-than-life-size figures, which depict the departure, victories, and glorious return of the French armies.

De bouw begon in 1806, ter ere van Napoleons overwinning bij Austerlitz. Pas rond 1836, onder koning Lodewijk Filips, werd de bouw voltooid. Onder de Arc de Triomphe werd na de Eerste Wereldoorlog het Graf van de onbekende soldaat aangelegd, die in die oorlog was gesneuveld. De Arc de Triomphe is veranderd in een monument ter nagedachtenis van de Eerste Wereldoorlog.

De triomfboog is ongeveer 50 m hoog en heeft een basis van 45 m bij 22 m. Het is de op twee na grootste triomfboog in de wereld, na die van Pyongyang in Noord-Korea en na het Monument voor de Revolutie in Mexico-Stad.

 

7.Seine River Cruises

Seine River

There are 37 bridges in Paris across the Seine (the most famous of which are the Pont Alexandre III and the Pont Neuf) and dozens more outside the city. A notable bridge, which is also the last along the course of the river, is the Pont de Normandie, the ninth longest cable-stayed bridge in the world, which links Le Havre and Honfleur.

The Seine is a 777-kilometre-long river in northern France. Its drainage basin is in the Paris Basin covering most of northern France. It rises at Source-Seine, 30 kilometres northwest of Dijon in northeastern France in the Langres plateau, flowing through Paris and into the English Channel at Le Havre.

A boat cruise along the Seine River is one of the best ways to soak up the alluring scenery of Paris. Seine River Cruises allow tourists to see the sights from a different perspective. The Seine River bridges, Eiffel Tower, Notre-Dame Cathedral, and the Louvre Museum look stunning from the viewpoint of a riverboat.

While a daytime cruise allows tourists to appreciate the glory of the monuments brightened by sunshine, the most romantic experience is an evening cruise. After sunset, the city’s landmarks are illuminated, which creates a special effect, and somehow the city seems more magical.

For a cruise that includes dinner, try the Bateaux Parisiens Seine River Gourmet Dinner & Sightseeing Cruise. This luxurious riverboat cruise departs at the Port de la Bourdonnais (near the Eiffel Tower), and guests are treated to a gourmet three-course meal.

alberta tourist attractions

alberta tourist attractions

Alberta is a province in Western Canada. Its landscape encompasses mountains, prairies, desert badlands and vast coniferous forests. It has more than 600 lakes, and rich mineral deposits. In the west, the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks have glaciers in the Columbia Icefields. The Waterton Glacier International Peace Park is a biosphere reserve that straddles the southern border with the USA.

Alberta is the fourth largest province by area at 661,848 square kilometres (255,541 square miles), and the fourth most populous, being home to 4,262,635 people.Alberta’s capital is Edmonton, while Calgary is its largest city. The two are Alberta’s largest census metropolitan areas. More than half of Albertans live in either Edmonton or Calgary, which contributes to continuing the rivalry between the two cities. English is the official language of the province. In 2016, 76.0% of Albertans were anglophone, 1.8% were francophone and 22.2% were allophone.

Alberta’s economy is based on hydrocarbons, petrochemical industries, livestock and agriculture. The oil and gas industry has been a pillar of Alberta’s economy since 1947, when substantial oil deposits were discovered at Leduc No. 1 well. It has also become a part of the province’s identity. Since Alberta is the province most rich in hydrocarbons, it provides 70% of the oil and natural gas exploited on Canadian soil. In 2018, Alberta’s output was CA$338.2 billion, 15.27% of Canada’s GDP.

 

1.Banff National Park

Banff National Park

Banff National Park is the most visited tourist attraction in Alberta and arguably the most impressive national park in Canada. Just 130 kilometers west of Calgary, the area encompasses spectacular mountain scenery, major ski resorts, beautiful lakes, and the tourist town of Banff.

Wildlife is abundant here, with grizzly bears, black bears, wolves, caribou, and elk, many of which are frequently sighted along the main highway through the park.

Hiking is one of the main summer activities in Banff, and there are many frontcountry and backcountry trails to choose from. Many people explore the park from the comfort of their car, stopping at the numerous roadside lookouts that offer impressive views over the mountains, lakes, and glaciers.

The Canadian Pacific Railway was instrumental in Banff’s early years, building the Banff Springs Hotel and Chateau Lake Louise, and attracting tourists through extensive advertising. In the early 20th century, roads were built in Banff, at times by war internees from World War I, and through Great Depression-era public works projects.Since the 1960s, park accommodations have been open all year, with annual tourism visits to Banff increasing to over 5 million in the 1990s. Millions more pass through the park on the Trans-Canada Highway.As Banff has over three million visitors annually, the health of its ecosystem has been threatened. In the mid-1990s, Parks Canada responded by initiating a two-year study which resulted in management recommendations and new policies that aim to preserve ecological integrity.

Banff National Park has a subarctic climate with three ecoregions, including montane, subalpine, and alpine. The forests are dominated by Lodgepole pine at lower elevations and Engelmann spruce in higher ones below the treeline, above which is primarily rocks and ice. Mammal species such as the grizzly bear, cougar, wolverine, elk, bighorn sheep and moose are found, along with hundreds of bird species. Reptiles and amphibians are also found but only a limited number of species have been recorded. The mountains are formed from sedimentary rocks which were pushed east over newer rock strata, between 80 and 55 million years ago. Over the past few million years, glaciers have at times covered most of the park, but today are found only on the mountain slopes though they include the Columbia Icefield, the largest uninterrupted glacial mass in the Rockies. Erosion from water and ice have carved the mountains into their current shapes.

 

2.Lake Louise

Lake Louise

Lake Louise, the jewel of Banff National Park, is famous for its beautiful turquoise colored water that reflects the surrounding mountains and Victoria Glacier. Located just a short drive north of the town of Banff, the lake is an easy day trip from Calgary.

From the grand Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise is a fabulous view across the lake. A walkway runs along the shoreline allowing visitors a lovely place for a leisurely stroll to absorb the atmosphere. Canoe rentals are also available for those who want to paddle out on the lake.

From the lakeside path, there are excellent hiking trails leading either up the mountain or beyond the lake towards the glacier. One of the most popular hiking trails is the hike up to the Lake Agnes Tea House.

Lake Louise (named Ho-run-num-nay (Lake of the Little Fishes) by the Stoney Nakota First Nations people)is a glacial lake within Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada. It is located 5 km (3.1 mi) west of the Hamlet of Lake Louise and the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 1).

Lake Louise is named after the Princess Louise Caroline Alberta (1848–1939), the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and the wife of the Marquess of Lorne, who was the Governor General of Canada from 1878 to 1883.

The turquoise colour of the water comes from rock flour carried into the lake by melt-water from the glaciers that overlook the lake. The lake has a surface of 0.8 km2 (0.31 sq mi) and is drained through the 3 km long Louise Creek into the Bow River.

Fairmont’s Chateau Lake Louise, one of Canada’s grand railway hotels, is located on Lake Louise’s eastern shore. It is a luxury resort hotel built in the early decades of the 20th century by the Canadian Pacific Railway.

Moraine Lake and Lake Agnes are also accessible from Lake Louise.

 

3. Icefields Parkway and the Columbia Icefield

Icefields Parkway and the Columbia Icefield

The Icefields Parkway runs from Lake Louise to Jasper and is one of the most beautiful drives in Canada. This 230-kilometer stretch of highway leads past lakes, mountains, glaciers, and waterfalls, with stopping points for visitors to get out and experience the landscape. Numerous hiking trails along the way, most of which are day hikes, lead to scenic lookouts over surrounding glaciers or lakes.

One of the main attractions along the Icefields Parkway is the Icefields Centre. This large visitor’s center features excellent displays on the Columbia Icefields and looks out over the Athabasca Glacier. From the road, it is difficult to comprehend the layout and size of the icefields, but models and photos at the center offer a unique perspective.

De Icefields Parkway (Frans: Promenade des Glaciers), ook Alberta Highway 93, is een weg in Alberta, Canada, die langs veel natuurschoon gaat in de Canadese Rocky Mountains, zoals canyons, gletsjers, en rivieren.

De parkway is 230 kilometer lang en werd voltooid in 1940. Hij loopt parallel aan de Continental Divide, de bergrug die van Alaska, door Canada en de Verenigde Staten naar Mexico loopt. De weg loopt van Jasper (nationaal park Jasper) naar Lake Louise (Alberta) (nationaal park Banff). Parkway is een algemene term voor snelweg door een fraai landschap.

 

4.Lake Louise Ski Resort

Lake Louise Ski Resort

Ski resort with many recreation activities, including warm-weather options, plus eateries & shops.

Lake Louise Ski Resort is one of the best ski resorts in Canada and is known around the world as a stop on the World Cup of skiing. Home to 164 named runs, plus a few through the trees that only locals know about, this ski hill has something for everyone.

Lake Louise Ski Resort is a popular family ski vacation destination for its well-regarded ski school, varied terrain, and good facilities. The resort is only a couple of hours from Calgary International Airport, making it easy to get to from destinations near and far.

The Lake Louise Ski Resort & Summer Gondola is a ski resort in western Canada, located in Banff National Park near the village of Lake Louise, Alberta. Located 57 km (35 mi) west of Banff, Lake Louise is one of three major ski resorts within Banff National Park.

The resort is situated on the southern slopes of the Slate Range, between the heights of Mount Richardson, Ptarmigan Peak, Pika Peak and Redoubt Mountain, all around 3,000 m (10,000 ft) above sea level. The base of the slopes is defined by Pipestone River, a tributary of the Bow River, immediately north of the intersections between Highway 1A (Bow Valley Trail), Highway 1 (Trans-Canada Highway), and Highway 93 (Icefields Parkway).

 

5.Calgary Stampede

Calgary Stampede

Calgary takes particular pride in its cowboy roots. This becomes most apparent during the city’s biggest event, the annual Calgary Stampede. This is a ten-day event held in early July, drawing rodeo participants and over 1 million fans from across North America. Calgary becomes the center of attention for all Wild West fans, with rodeo attractions, cultural exhibits, country music, and a range of other outdoor spectacles.

The event’s roots are traced to 1886 when the Calgary and District Agricultural Society held its first fair. In 1912, American promoter Guy Weadick organized his first rodeo and festival, known as the Stampede. He returned to Calgary in 1919 to organize the Victory Stampede in honour of soldiers returning from World War I. Weadick’s festival became an annual event in 1923 when it merged with the Calgary Industrial Exhibition to create the Calgary Exhibition and Stampede.

Organized by thousands of volunteers and supported by civic leaders, the Calgary Stampede has grown into one of the world’s richest rodeos, one of Canada’s largest festivals, and a significant tourist attraction for the city. Rodeo and chuckwagon racing events are televised across Canada. However, both have been the target of increasing international criticism by animal welfare groups and politicians concerned about particular events as well as animal rights organizations seeking to ban rodeo in general.
Calgary’s national and international identity is tied to the event. It is known as the “Stampede City”, carries the informal nickname of “Cowtown”, and the local Canadian Football League team is called the Stampeders. The city takes on a party atmosphere during Stampede: office buildings and storefronts are painted in cowboy themes, residents don western wear, and events held across the city include hundreds of pancake breakfasts and barbecues.

The Calgary Stampede is an annual rodeo, exhibition, and festival held every July in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

 

6.Drumheller and the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology

Drumheller and the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology

Located approximately 140 kilometers northeast of Calgary is the small town of Drumheller, which proudly calls itself the “Town of the Dinosaurs.” Around 75 million years ago, various species of dinosaurs inhabited this region, and many fossils have been discovered in and around Drumheller. The Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology displays some of the finds and offers an in-depth look at the history of the area.

The landscape around Drumheller consists mainly of badlands. Interesting hiking trails lead past hoodoos and through unique rock formations. The “Dinosaur Trail” is a driving tour that leads through some of the area’s main attractions.

The Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology is a palaeontology museum and research facility in Drumheller, Alberta, Canada. The museum was named in honour of Joseph Burr Tyrrell, and is situated within a 12,500-square-metre-building designed by BCW Architects at Midland Provincial Park.

The museum’s personal collection includes over 160,000 cataloged fossils, consisting of over 350 holotypes, providing the museum with the largest collection of fossils in Canada. The museum displays approximately 800 fossils from its collection in its museum exhibits. In addition to exhibits, the museum’s fossil collection are also used by the museum’s research program, which carries a mandate to document and analyze geological and palaeontological history.

 

7.West Edmonton Mall

West Edmonton Mall

West Edmonton Mall is a shopping mall in Edmonton, Alberta, that is owned, managed, and operated by Triple Five Group. It is the second most visited mall in Canada, after the Toronto Eaton Centre in Toronto, followed by Metrotown Mall in Burnaby, and the 14th largest in the world by gross leasable area.

The West Edmonton Mall is more than just shops. Contained within this huge complex is the World Waterpark, the Ice Palace ice rink, mini golf, an aquarium with live shows, a bowling alley, a mirror maze, indoor electric go-kart racing, and movie theaters. Of course shopping is important, too. The mall has all kinds of stores for everything you could imagine.

The mall is a destination within Alberta, particularly in winter, where families can come to escape the cold and enjoy some indoor fun and shopping.

West Edmonton Mall covers a gross area of about 490,000 m2 (5,300,000 sq ft).It holds over 800 stores and services including nine attractions, two hotels and over 100 dining venues in the complex, and parking for more than 20,000 vehicles More than 24,000 people are employed at the property. The mall receives about 32 million visitors per year; it attracts between 90,000 and 200,000 shoppers daily, depending on the day and season.

Vancouver Tourist Attractions

Vancouver Tourist Attractions

Vancouver, a bustling west coast seaport in British Columbia, is among Canada’s densest, most ethnically diverse cities. A popular filming location, it’s surrounded by mountains, and also has thriving art, theatre and music scenes. Vancouver Art Gallery is known for its works by regional artists, while the Museum of Anthropology houses preeminent First Nations collections.

Vancouver is one of the most ethnically and linguistically diverse cities in Canada: 49.3 percent of its residents are not native English speakers, 47.8 percent are native speakers of neither English nor French, and 54.5 percent of residents belong to visible minority groups. It has been consistently ranked one of the most livable cities in Canada and in the world. In terms of housing affordability, Vancouver is also one of the most expensive cities in Canada and in the world.
Vancouver plans to become the greenest city in the world. Vancouverism is the city’s urban planning design philosophy.

 

1.Stanley Park

Stanley Park

Stanley Park is a 405-hectare public park in British Columbia, Canada that makes up the northwestern half of Vancouver’s Downtown Peninsula, surrounded by waters of Burrard Inlet and English Bay.

Stanley Park is a lush peninsula of huge trees adjacent to Downtown Vancouver. If you are looking to get outside and enjoy some nature, this is the best place to visit in Vancouver. A paved seawall path encircles the green space and is a wonderful place to explore on foot or by bicycle.

Inland, the park offers many things to do, and you can spend a full day exploring attractions like the totem poles at Brockton Point or the Vancouver Aquarium. Spectacular views are a standard throughout the park either back towards the city or out to the ocean.

Unlike other large urban parks, Stanley Park is not the creation of a landscape architect, but rather the evolution of a forest and urban space over many years. Most of the manmade structures present in the park were built between 1911 and 1937 under the influence of then superintendent W.S. Rawlings. Additional attractions, such as a polar bear exhibit, aquarium, and a miniature train, were added in the post-war period.

 

2. Granville Island

Granville Island

Granville Island is a peninsula and shopping district in the Fairview neighbourhood of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It is located across False Creek from Downtown Vancouver under the south end of the Granville Street Bridge. The peninsula was an industrial manufacturing area in the 20th century.

Once mainly industrial, Granville Island is now a thriving center of activity with a relaxed and distinctive atmosphere. Artists and retailers have moved into converted warehouses alongside houseboats, theaters, galleries, and restaurants.

The Granville Island Public Market is one of the most popular attractions selling fruit and vegetables, seafood, and a great variety of other specialties as well as ready-to-eat items. Not truly an island, the arts hub is linked to residential areas by one road and footbridges to the south, and to the Downtown peninsula (across False Creek) by ferry.

Between 1998 and 2011, the Vancouver Downtown Historic Railway operated between Granville Island and Science World. The streetcar is now permanently shut down.

 

3.Ski Mountain

Ski Mountain

In both winter and summer, Grouse Mountain offers an unmatched panorama in clear weather. That’s especially so in the evenings when the city lights are on.

A gondola operates daily running from street level to the summit, where dining, activities, and wildlife await mountaintop explorers year-round.

When the snow flies, Grouse Mountain is a winter wonderland offering outdoor skating, snowshoeing, skiing, and snowboarding. The ski runs are not particularly difficult, and Grouse Mountain is a fun family outing. It’s also a great place to learn how to ski.

 

4.Vancouver Aquarium

Vancouver Aquarium

The Vancouver Aquarium is a public aquarium located in Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. In addition to being a major tourist attraction for Vancouver, the aquarium is a centre for marine research, ocean literacy education, climate activism, conservation and marine animal rehabilitation.

A trip with the family to Stanley Park for most folks would be incomplete without visiting the Vancouver Aquarium. This wonderful facility teaches young and old about the wonders of the ocean and how we can protect it.

Fun and entertaining experiences include a cold-water touch tank; a wildlife rescue area complete with a Burmese tortoise; Penguin Cove, full of cute creatures; and the non-stop action of the sea otters in their habitat. One thing not to miss is the 4D Theatre Experience with special seats, effects, and a large screen that make you feel you are part of what you are seeing.

The Vancouver Aquarium was one of the first facilities to incorporate professional naturalists into the galleries to interpret animal behaviours. Prior to this, at the London Zoo Fish House, naturalists James S. Bowerbank, Ray Lankester, David W. Mitchell and Philip H. Gosse (the creator of the word aquarium) had regularly held “open house” events, but the Vancouver Aquarium was the first to employ educational naturalists on a full-time basis. Aquarium research projects extend worldwide, and include marine mammal rescue and rehabilitation.

On August 9, 2010 Prime Minister Stephen Harper and B.C. Premier Gordon Campbell announced capital funding of up to $15 million. The province would donate $10 million in funding over the next three years to help pay for a planned expansion of the 54-year-old facility, Premier Gordon Campbell said. Harper added that Ottawa would hand over up to $5 million to the aquarium for infrastructure upgrades.The aquarium, however, remained nonprofit organization. The property is owned by the City of Vancouver and rented to the aquarium for $40,000 a year since 1991 (prior to which it was $1 per year).

 

5. Museum of Anthropology

Museum of Anthropology

Part of the University of British Columbia, the Museum of Anthropology deals with cultures from around the world, but places particular emphasis on British Columbia First Nations.

Exhibits display native art, including large totem poles in the Great Hall. Other presentations explore ethnographic and archaeological objects representing Asia, the South Pacific, the Americas, Africa, and Europe.

The interesting building was originally part of a WWII-era fort, and local architect Arthur Erickson transformed the spaces into this world-class museum.

Other attractions on the university campus include the clothing-optional shoreline of Wreck Beach, the natural-history-focused Beaty Biodiversity Museum, and the rambling UBC Botanical Garden with its many interesting plantings and delicate Nitobe Japanese Garden.

The Museum of Anthropology includes a number of large sculptures, totem poles, and cultural artifacts. Although MOA’s focus is on the First Nations of the Northwest Coast, the collection of close to 50,000 ethnological objects includes objects from all continents. The collections include contemporary works as well as historical objects. In addition to the ethnographic collections, MOA houses an archaeological collection of approximately 535,000 pieces. These are managed by UBC’s Laboratory of Archaeology. The museum also has a small wing dedicated to European ceramic art works collected by the late Walter Koerner.

The most iconic object in the museum is probably the yellow cedar sculpture The Raven and the First Men by Bill Reid, which was depicted on the Canadian twenty-dollar bill from 2004 to 2012 (the Canadian Journey Series). Other notable Bill Reid works include his Bear and Wasco (Sea Wolf) sculptures, some of his gold jewellery, and a prototype of the Haida dugout canoe he carved for Expo 86.

 

6.Kitsilano Beach

Kitsilano Beach

The sandy shoreline of Kitsilano Beach defines the laid-back, fun-loving Vancouver lifestyle. It’s a place locals hang out with friends or take a dip in the outdoor heated seawater swimming pool. The wide beach here is popular with sun bathers in the summer.

Views from Kitsilano over the city center are wonderful. In addition to the beach and oceanfront, the area has a number of cafés and walking trails, and a vibrant shopping strip lies a few blocks south on West Fourth Avenue.

A short stroll to the east of Kitsilano is Vanier Park, where you’ll find wide-open spaces and the Vancouver Maritime Museum. Catch a small Aquabus to downtown Vancouver or Granville Island from the docks located here.

Kitsilano Beach is one of the most popular beaches in Vancouver, especially in the warm summer months. Located at the north edge of the Kitsilano neighbourhood, the beach faces out onto English Bay.

 

7.Explore Gastown

Kitsilano Beach

The oldest part of the city, Gastown is an area of restaurants, galleries, and shops set in carefully restored Victorian buildings. Heritage structures, cobblestone streets, and iron lampposts give the district its distinctive atmosphere. Gastown is a short walk from Canada Place.

Gastown came into existence in 1867 when a man called John Deighton arrived on the scene. Deighton had a habit of launching into lengthy stories and soon acquired the nickname “Gassy Jack.” As a result, the vicinity became known as “Gassy’s Town” or “Gastown.”

A statue of the proprietor now watches over the neighborhood in Maple Tree Square. Tourists stop for photos with Gassy Jack, and also love to visit the nearby Steam Clock, which puffs steam-powered chimes every 15 minutes.

Ottawa tourist attractions

Ottawa tourist attractions

Ottawa is Canada’s capital, in the east of southern Ontario, near the city of Montréal and the U.S. border. Sitting on the Ottawa River, it has at its centre Parliament Hill, with grand Victorian architecture and museums such as the National Gallery of Canada, with noted collections of indigenous and other Canadian art. The park-lined Rideau Canal is filled with boats in summer and ice-skaters in winter.

Ottawa is the political centre of Canada and headquarters to the federal government. The city houses numerous foreign embassies, key buildings, organizations, and institutions of Canada’s government, including the Parliament of Canada, the Supreme Court, the residence of Canada’s viceroy, and Office of the Prime Minister.

Ottawa has the most educated population among Canadian cities and is home to a number of colleges and universities, research and cultural institutions, including the University of Ottawa, Carleton University, Algonquin College, the National Arts Centre, the National Gallery of Canada; and numerous national museums, monuments, and historic sites. It is one of the most visited cities in Canada, with over 11 million visitors in 2018.

 

1.Rideau Canal

Rideau Canal

The Rideau Canal, also known unofficially as the Rideau Waterway, connects Canada’s capital city of Ottawa, Ontario, to Lake Ontario and the Saint Lawrence River at Kingston. It is 202 kilometres long.

The canal was opened in 1832 as a precaution in case of war with the United States. It remains in use today primarily for pleasure boating, with most of its original structures intact. The locks on the system open for navigation in mid-May and close in mid-October. It is the oldest continuously operated canal system in North America. In 2007 it was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The 200-kilometer-long (but only 1.6-meter-deep) Rideau Canal, connects Ottawa with Kingston on Lake Ontario. Sometimes also called the Rideau Waterway, it was originally intended as a strategic route between Montréal and Lake Ontario, the military need for which was demonstrated during the war with the United States in 1812.

In summer, the canal and locks are an active waterway. Fun things to do include taking a Rideau Canal cruise aboard one of the many tour boats that ply the water here (better still, splash out on an overnight cruise of the canal!).

 

2.Canadian War Museum

Canadian War Museum

The Canadian War Museum is a national museum on the country’s military history in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The museum serves as both an educational facility on Canadian military history, in addition to serving as a place of remembrance.

The Canadian War Museum was formally established in 1942, although portions of the museum’s collections originate from a military museum that operated from 1880 to 1896. The museum was operated by the Public Archives of Canada until 1967, when the National Museums of Canada Corporation was formed to manage several national institutions, including the war museum. In the same year, the war museum was relocated from its original building to the former Public Archives of Canada building. Management of the museum was later assumed by the Canadian Museum of Civilization Corporation (later renamed the Canadian Museum of History Corporation) in 1990. Plans to expand the museum during the mid-1990s resulted in the construction of a new building at LeBreton Flats. Designed by Moriyama & Teshima Architects and Griffiths Rankin Cook Architects, the new Canadian War Museum building was opened to the public in 2005.

The museum’s collection contains over 500,000 pieces of materials related to military history, including over 13,000 pieces of military art. In addition to its permanent exhibition, the museum has hosted and organized a number of travelling exhibitions relating to Canadian military history.

 

3.Parliament Hill

Parliament Hill

Parliament Hill, colloquially known as The Hill, is an area of Crown land on the southern banks of the Ottawa River in downtown Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Its Gothic revival suite of buildings, and their architectural elements of national symbolic importance, is the home of the Parliament of Canada.

The Parliament Buildings, in all their splendor of Victorian Gothic sandstone, are quite an imposing sight on the 50-meter-high Parliament Hill (Colline du Parlement) looking out over the Ottawa River.

For hundreds of years, the hill served as a landmark on the Ottawa River for First Nations and, later, European traders, adventurers, and industrialists, to mark their journey to the interior of the continent. After Ottawa, then called Bytown, was founded, the builders of the Rideau Canal used the hill as a location for a military base,[3] naming it Barrack Hill. A large fortress was planned for the site following the War of 1812 and the Upper Canada rebellion, but the threat of an American invasion subsided, and the project was scrapped.

 

4.Peace Tower

Peace Tower

ThePeace Tower is a focal bell and clock tower sitting on the central axis of the Centre Block of the Canadian parliament buildings in Ottawa, Ontario.

The panoramic view from the observation deck at the top of the Peace Tower (Tour de la Paix), the highest point in Ottawa, encompasses Parliament Hill, the entire city, the river, Gatineau, and the hills to the north. On your way up in the elevator, you will get a look at the tower’s bells, and there is a memorial room to Canadians who died in WWI.

While access to the tower – sometimes also called the “Tower of Victory and Peace” – is free, you must first get a ticket. (Check the official government site below for details.)

Designed by Jean Omer Marchand and John A. Pearson, the tower is a campanile whose height reaches 92.2 m (302 ft 6 in), over which are arranged a multitude of stone carvings, including approximately 370 gargoyles, grotesques, and friezes, keeping with the Victorian High Gothic style of the rest of the parliamentary complex. The walls are of Nepean sandstone and the roof is of reinforced concrete covered with copper.

 

5.National Gallery of Canada

National Gallery of Canada

The National Gallery of Canada, located in the capital city of Ottawa, Ontario, is Canada’s national art museum. The museum’s building takes up 46,621 square metres, with 12,400 square metres of space used for exhibiting art. It is one of the largest art museums in North America by exhibition space.

Ultra-modern and designed by Moshe Safdie, the National Gallery of Canada (Musée des Beaux-Arts du Canada) is an architectural masterpiece with prism-like glass towers that echo the lines of the nearby Parliament Buildings. The glass contrasts with the mock medieval Château Laurier, yet the attraction still fits well into Ottawa’s cityscape.

Inside what is one of the largest art museums in North America, galleries display aboriginal art, trace the development of Canadian art from religious works to the Group of Seven, explore European Impressionism, and show temporary exhibitions. The rooms of Inuit art are on the lower level under the glass-encased Great Hall. Admission to this fine gallery is free Thursdays from 5pm – 8pm.

The museum’s permanent collection includes over 93,000 works from European, American, and Asian, Canadian, and Indigenous artists. In addition to exhibiting works from its permanent collection, the museum also organizes and hosts a number of travelling exhibitions.

 

6.Diefenbunker, Canada’s Cold War Museum

Diefenbunker, Canada's Cold War Museum

The Diefenbunker, formerly known by its military designation, Canadian Forces Station Carp, is a large underground four-storey reinforced concrete bunker and nuclear fallout shelter located in the rural area of Carp, Ontario approximately 30 km west of downtown Ottawa.

Canada’s Cold War Museum is located outside of Ottawa in a large underground facility that was constructed in the early 1960s to protect important functions of the Canadian government in the event of a nuclear war.

Irreverently known as the “Diefenbunker,” this structure is a powerful symbol of Canada’s response to the Cold War. Designed in the 1950s to withstand all but a direct hit by a nuclear weapon, it was intended to shelter key political and military personnel during a nuclear attack. Fortunately, it never served its intended purpose, although the Diefenbaker government made plans to retreat to its protection during the Cuban missile crisis of 1962. The bunker functioned as the hub of a communications network and civil defence system until it closed in 1994.

 

7.Notre-Dame Cathedral Basilica

Notre-Dame Cathedral Basilica

The Notre-Dame Cathedral Basilica is a Roman Catholic minor basilica in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada located on 385 Sussex Drive in the Lower Town neighbourhood. It was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1990.

Opposite the National Gallery, Notre-Dame Cathedral is a beautiful Catholic basilica consecrated in 1846. It is particularly noted for the interior mahogany carvings by Philippe Parizeau and figures of the four evangelists, prophets, and apostles by Louis-Philippe Hébert.

The basilica is the oldest and largest church in Ottawa and the seat of the city’s Roman Catholic archbishop. Its twin spires and gilded Madonna are easily identifiable from nearby Parliament Hill and the surrounding area. The church was last renovated and restored in the late 1990s. Services are held in both French and English. Its Easter and Christmas masses are telecast nationally on Salt+Light Television every year.

Montreal tourist attractions

Montreal tourist attractions

Montréal is the largest city in Canada’s Québec province. It’s set on an island in the Saint Lawrence River and named after Mt. Royal, the triple-peaked hill at its heart. Its boroughs, many of which were once independent cities, include neighbourhoods ranging from cobblestoned, French colonial Vieux-Montréal – with the Gothic Revival Notre-Dame Basilica at its centre – to bohemian Plateau.

Historically the commercial capital of Canada, Montreal was surpassed in population and in economic strength by Toronto in the 1970s. It remains an important centre of commerce, aerospace, transport, finance, pharmaceuticals, technology, design, education, art, culture, tourism, food, fashion, video game development, film, and world affairs. Montreal is the location of the headquarters of the International Civil Aviation Organization, and was named a UNESCO City of Design in 2006. In 2017, Montreal was ranked the 12th-most liveable city in the world by the Economist Intelligence Unit in its annual Global Liveability Ranking, although it slipped to rank 40 in the 2021 index, primarily due to stress on the healthcare system from the COVID-19 pandemic. It is regularly ranked as a top ten city in the world to be a university student in the QS World University Rankings.

 

1.Wander through Old Montreal

Old Montreal

Dating to the 17th century, Old Montreal’s narrow cobblestone streets are full of lively plazas and charming shops and cafes. Landmarks include the Notre-Dame Basilica, a soaring Gothic Revival church, and the Pointe-à-Callière museum with city archeological ruins. Along the St. Lawrence River, the Old Port of Montreal is home to the Montreal Science Centre and the iconic Clock Tower, with views from the top.

Old Montréal is tourist central in Montréal. The area is home to a remarkable concentration of buildings dating from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries and has the delightful feel of a Parisian-style quarter. Many of these historic buildings are now hotels, restaurants, galleries, and souvenir shops. If you are looking to base yourself in the city for a few days of sightseeing, this is the best place to stay.

Its many historic sites, streets, and landmarks are easily explored on foot. Of the many things to do here, the highlights are visiting the Notre-Dame Basilica, strolling down Rue Saint-Paul, wandering around Bonsecours Market, and enjoying the open-air gathering space of Place Jacques-Cartier. For a little urban adventure, on the waterfront is the huge Ferris wheel (La Grand roue de Montréal) and the Tyrolienne MTL zipline.

 

2. See the View from Mont-Royal

Mont-Royal

Mount Royal is a large intrusive rock hill or small mountain in the city of Montreal, immediately west of Downtown Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The best-known hypothesis for the origin of the name Montreal is the hill is the namesake for the city.

Mont-Royal rises 233 meters above the city and is the green lung near the city center. A stroll through this lovely park enables the visitor to see monuments to Jacques Cartier and King George VI, to spend some time by Lac-aux-Castors, and to have a look at the cemeteries on the western slope where the city’s different ethnic groups have rested in peace together for centuries.

is a large intrusive rock hill or small mountain in the city of Montreal, immediately west of Downtown Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The best-known hypothesis for the origin of the name Montreal is the hill is the namesake for the city.

The hill is part of the Monteregian Hills situated between the Laurentians and the Appalachian Mountains. It gave its Latin name, Mons Regius, to the Monteregian chain. The hill consists of three peaks: Colline de la Croix (or Mont Royal proper) at 233 m (764 ft), Colline d’Outremont (or Mount Murray, in the borough of Outremont) at 211 m (692 ft), and Westmount Summit at 201 m (659 ft) elevation above mean sea level.

 

3.Explore the Old Port

As you wander around Old Montreal, you’ll most likely end up in the lively area by the Saint Lawrence River known as the Old Port (Vieux-Port). Here, you’ll find plenty of things to do, from riding the giant Ferris wheel or climbing the famous clock tower, right through to screaming down a zipline that descends from dizzying heights across open stretches of water.

The historical Old Port offers Montrealers and visitors alike access to a wide variety of activities, including the Montréal Science Centre, with an IMAX Theatre, and the Montreal Clock Tower. It offers riverfront access for walking, cycling, roller-blading, quadricycle, pedalo and Segway rentals. It is also located at the eastern end of the Lachine Canal, which has itself been extensively refurbished as a popular destination for cycling, roller-blading and pleasure boating. Cultural events include the Festival Montréal en lumière, Igloofest and the Matsuri Japon festival.

The Old Port was also known as one of the most famous fishing spots in the greater Montreal area. A popular shore fishing position is Parc de la Cité-du-Havre, which provides a fishing spot with a wide range of fish species. In the winter, ice fishing events were held on the ice inside the old port.

 

4.Notre-Dame Basilica

Notre-Dame Basilica

Founded in 1656, Montréal’s oldest church, Notre-Dame Basilica, stands in a far grander incarnation than the original. The twin towers of the neo-Gothic façade face Place d’Armes. The intricate and resplendent interior was designed by Victor Bourgeau.

Construction of the cathedral began in 1163 under Bishop Maurice de Sully and was largely completed by 1260, though it was modified frequently in the centuries that followed. In the 1790s, during the French Revolution, Notre-Dame suffered extensive desecration; much of its religious imagery was damaged or destroyed. In the 19th century, the coronation of Napoleon I and the funerals of many of the French Republic’s presidents took place at the cathedral.

The 1831 publication of Victor Hugo’s novel Notre-Dame de Paris (known in English as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame) inspired popular interest in the cathedral, which led to a major restoration project between 1844 and 1864, supervised by Eugène Viollet-le-Duc. On August 26, 1944, the Liberation of Paris from German occupation was celebrated in Notre-Dame with the singing of the Magnificat. Beginning in 1963, the cathedral’s façade was cleaned of centuries of soot and grime. Another cleaning and restoration project was carried out between 1991 and 2000.

The cathedral is one of the most widely recognized symbols of the city of Paris and the French nation. In 1805, it was awarded the honorary status of a minor basilica. As the cathedral of the archdiocese of Paris, Notre-Dame contains the cathedra of the archbishop of Paris (Laurent Ulrich).

 

5.Parc Jean Drapeau

Parc Jean Drapeau

Jean Drapeau Park is the third-largest park in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. It comprises two islands, Saint Helen’s Island and the artificial island Notre Dame Island, situated off the shore of Old Montreal in the Saint Lawrence River. The islands were the site of the Expo 67 World’s Fair.

Île Sainte-Hélène (named after the wife of Samuel de Champlain) and the artificial island of Notre-Dame were the site of Expo ’67. They are now known as Parc Jean Drapeau and have many family-minded attractions.

The islands were the site of the Expo 67 World’s Fair. Notre Dame Island was constructed for the exposition, and Saint Helen’s Island artificially extended at its north and south ends. The park was renamed in honour of Jean Drapeau, the late mayor of Montreal and initiator of Expo 67.

 

6.Place des Arts

Place des Arts

The Place des Arts is an entire complex dedicated to visual and performing arts, the largest of its kind in all Canada. Three great cultural organizations make their home here: the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, and the Opéra de Montréal, and its various stages and rehearsal halls provide venues for all kinds of theater, music, dance, films, and events. These sit around a large esplanade decorated with works of art, fountains, and water cascades, a popular venue for events. The most important of these is the annual summer Festival International de Jazz de Montréal held in late June and early July, attracting visitors from all over the world and bringing in some of the biggest names in jazz.

Place des Arts was an initiative of Mayor Jean Drapeau, a noted lover of opera, as part of a project to expand the downtown core eastward from the concentration of business and financial activity in the centre-west part of downtown. The Corporation George-Étienne-Cartier, named in honour of George-Étienne Cartier, a Father of Confederation and opera lover, was set up to build it, and the first part of the complex (including the Salle Wilfrid-Pelletier) was inaugurated on September 21, 1963. The other theatres were added progressively.

 

7. Shop at Atwater and Jean Talon Markets

Atwater and Jean Talon

Similar establishments with many of the same vendors, the Atwater Market and Jean Talon Market are Montréal’s busiest public markets and well worth visiting for their atmosphere and local food specialties and products.

Located in warehouse-style buildings, the markets feature vendors selling fruits and vegetables, flowers, meats, fish, cheese, baked goods, and specialty foods. You’ll find maple syrup and candies, dried wild blueberries, home-style fruit jams and preserves, and the region’s fine cheeses, as well as restaurants and cafés selling luscious pastries. The markets are a favorite stop for locals on Saturday mornings for a boule of coffee and a flaky croissant.

 

Toronto tourist attractions

Toronto tourist attractions

Toronto, the capital of the province of Ontario, is a major Canadian city along Lake Ontario’s northwestern shore. It’s a dynamic metropolis with a core of soaring skyscrapers, all dwarfed by the iconic, free-standing CN Tower. Toronto also has many green spaces, from the orderly oval of Queen’s Park to 400-acre High Park and its trails, sports facilities and zoo.

Indigenous peoples have travelled through and inhabited the Toronto area, located on a broad sloping plateau interspersed with rivers, deep ravines, and urban forest, for more than 10,000 years. After the broadly disputed Toronto Purchase, when the Mississauga surrendered the area to the British Crown,] the British established the town of York in 1793 and later designated it as the capital of Upper Canada. During the War of 1812, the town was the site of the Battle of York and suffered heavy damage by American troops. York was renamed and incorporated in 1834 as the city of Toronto. It was designated as the capital of the province of Ontario in 1867 during Canadian Confederation. The city proper has since expanded past its original limits through both annexation and amalgamation to its current area of 630.2 km2 (243.3 sq mi).

Toronto is a prominent centre for music, theatre,motion picture production, and television production, and is home to the headquarters of Canada’s major national broadcast networks and media outlets. Its varied cultural institutions, which include numerous museums and galleries, festivals and public events, entertainment districts, national historic sites, and sports activities,attract over 43 million tourists each year. Toronto is known for its many skyscrapers and high-rise buildings, in particular the tallest free-standing structure on land outside of Asia, the CN Tower.

 

1.Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada

Ripley's Aquarium of Canada

Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada is a public aquarium in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The aquarium is one of three aquariums owned-and-operated by Ripley Entertainment. It is located in downtown Toronto, just southeast of the CN Tower.

A Ripley’s Aquarium was originally planned in 2004 to be built in Niagara Falls, Ontario, next to what is now Great Wolf Lodge around 2007, but plans fell through and Ripley’s eventually relocated to Toronto. Construction began on the attraction in August 2011 with a final cost approaching CA$130 million. The aquarium opened to the public in October 2013.

Ripley’s Aquarium has been the target of animal liberation groups such as TARA (Toronto Aquarium Resistance) and MAD (Marineland Animal Defence), which claim animal captivity is synonymous with animal abuse. They regularly conduct protests and demonstrations at the facility. Prominent animal conservationist Bob Timmons has also publicly spoken out against Ripley Aquarium’s capture of endangered tiger sharks.

 

2.Day Trip to Niagara Falls

Niagara Falls

Niagara Falls (/naɪˈæɡərə/) is a group of three waterfalls at the southern end of Niagara Gorge, spanning the border between the province of Ontario in Canada and the state of New York in the United States. The largest of the three is Horseshoe Falls, which straddles the international border of the two countries. It is also known as the Canadian Falls.The smaller American Falls and Bridal Veil Falls lie within the United States. Bridal Veil Falls is separated from Horseshoe Falls by Goat Island and from American Falls by Luna Island, with both islands situated in New York.

Formed by the Niagara River, which drains Lake Erie into Lake Ontario, the combined falls have the highest flow rate of any waterfall in North America that has a vertical drop of more than 50 m (160 ft). During peak daytime tourist hours, more than 168,000 m3 (5.9 million cu ft) of water goes over the crest of the falls every minute. Horseshoe Falls is the most powerful waterfall in North America, as measured by flow rate. Niagara Falls is famed for its beauty and is a valuable source of hydroelectric power. Balancing recreational, commercial, and industrial uses has been a challenge for the stewards of the falls since the 19th century.

 

3.See the Animals at the Toronto Zoo

the Toronto Zoo

The Toronto Zoo is a zoo located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Encompassing 287 hectares, the Toronto Zoo is the largest zoo in Canada. It is divided into seven zoogeographic regions: Indo-Malaya, Africa, Americas, Tundra Trek, Australasia, Eurasia, and the Canadian Domain.

The zoo is a corporation owned by the municipal government of Toronto. Founded by John Cameron Egan and business partner, Hugh A. Crothers, an industrialist who became the first Chairman of the Metro Toronto Zoological Society in 1966, the zoo opened on August 15, 1974, as the Metropolitan Toronto Zoo. The word “Metropolitan” was dropped from its name when the individual municipalities that make up the Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto was amalgamated into the current city in 1998. The zoo is located near the Rouge River on the western border of Rouge Park in the city’s east end district of Scarborough.

Opened in 1998, the African Savanna became the zoo’s largest expansion in history. The African Savanna combined with the African Rainforest Pavilion encompasses most of the southern third of the zoo. The African Savanna featured species include white lions, Grévy’s zebras, olive baboons, greater kudus, cheetahs, white rhinoceroses, Common hippopotamuses, spotted hyenas, watusi cattle, blue wildebeests, common elands, African penguins and Masai giraffes. The African Rainforest Pavilion holds the world’s largest indoor gorilla exhibit, home to Charles, as well as dozens of other African species, including meerkats, red river hogs, dwarf crocodiles, and pygmy hippopotamuses. The south side of the pavilion was completely refurbished in 2011 and showcases ring-tailed lemurs and Aldabra giant tortoises.

 

4.See the View from the CN Tower

the CN Tower

The CN Tower is a 553.3 m-high concrete communications and observation tower in downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Built on the former Railway Lands, it was completed in 1976. Its name “CN” referred to Canadian National, the railway company that built the tower.

The CN Tower held the record for the world’s tallest free-standing structure for 32 years, from 1975 until 2007, when it was surpassed by the Burj Khalifa, and was the world’s tallest tower until 2009 when it was surpassed by the Canton Tower. It is currently the ninth-tallest free-standing structure in the world and remains the tallest free-standing structure on land in the Western Hemisphere. In 1995, the CN Tower was declared one of the modern Seven Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. It also belongs to the World Federation of Great Towers.

It is a signature icon of Toronto’s skyline and attracts more than two million international visitors annually. It houses several observation decks, a revolving restaurant at some 1,150 feet (350 m), and an entertainment complex.

 

5.Wander through St. Lawrence Market

St. Lawrence Market

The St. Lawrence Market South building is a major public market building in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is located on the southwest corner of Front and Lower Jarvis Streets. Along with the St. Lawrence Market North and St. Lawrence Hall, it comprises the St. Lawrence Market complex.

St. Lawrence Market was first established in the early 19th century, originating from a proclamation that established a designated area near King Street and New Street (later renamed Jarvis Street) for a public market in 1803. The first buildings erected for the market emerged in 1814, with the first permanent structures built in 1820. The first permanent market building was later replaced in 1831 with the first St. Lawrence Market North building. The market also served as one of four post offices in York prior to 1834. The building was damaged after the Great Fire of Toronto of 1849, and was replaced with a new building in 1851. The market was expanded in the early 1900s, with portions of the former city hall of Toronto being integrated into a new building, opened as St. Lawrence Market South in 1902, and a new matching building erected to replace the north building in 1904. The north building was later replaced with a new building in 1968. In 2016, the north building was demolished to make way for a new building.

The St. Lawrence Market houses a variety of vendors selling various food products, flowers, and specialty items. The St. Lawrence Hall was built in Toronto in 1850 and served as a public meeting place and a concert venue.

If you’ve been shopping or touring nearby, this is an excellent spot to stop in for a bite to eat or to relax with friends over a cup of coffee. In the summer, outdoor patios on elevated spaces allow you to soak up some of the warm sunshine.

The hall was restored in 1967 but has retained much of its old charm. The building provides a unique atmosphere for the market and is also occasionally used for film and television shoots. The interior features a grand staircase and a gas-lit chandelier.

6.Tour CasaLoma

Tour CasaLoma

Casa Loma is a Gothic Revival castle-style mansion and garden in midtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada, that is now a historic house museum and landmark. It was constructed from 1911 to 1914 as a residence for financier Sir Henry Pellatt. The architect was E. J. Lennox, who designed several other city landmarks.

Standing in beautifully kept grounds, Casa Loma is an extraordinary building somewhat reminiscent of a medieval castle. It was originally constructed in 1914 for Sir Henry Pellatt, an eccentric Canadian multi-millionaire who was among the first to recognize and exploit the money-making potential of Niagara Falls.

With close to 100 rooms, including three dozen bathrooms, the house is now a museum. Visitors can take a look back in time to a period of European elegance and splendor. Canada’s foremost castle is complete with decorated suites, secret passages, an 800-foot tunnel, towers, stables, and five acres of estate gardens.

A prime example of modern Toronto’s commitment to its rich history, Casa Loma was first built in 1914 by financier Sir Henry Pellatt. The castle located in midtown Toronto, is now owned by the City of Toronto and is regarded as a treasured heritage landmark. Today, operated by the Liberty Entertainment Group, Casa Loma is one of Toronto’s top tourist attractions and hospitality venues. Each year over 650,000 visitors tour Casa Loma and the estate gardens. A perfect backdrop for special occasions, Casa Loma also plays host to over 250 private events annually. The unique architecture has also made it a highly desirable location for film, television and photo shoots.”

 

7.Stroll through Kensington Market

Kensington Market

Kensington Market is an area of Toronto with a bohemian and multicultural feel. On a typical summer’s day, the smell of incense wafts through the air; music from a street-side musician can be heard; and the numerous retailers, who mostly operate out of old two-story brick homes, set up their goods on designated areas of their deck-covered lawns or on the sidewalks. This is a fantastic area for a stroll.

The shops, many of which display colorful murals and street art, sell everything from Tibetan blankets to jewelry, bags, purses, and vintage clothing, and there are even a couple of cheese shops. Restaurants and coffee shops here offer a multicultural festival of choices that include Jamaican, Mexican, Tibetan, or more basic options like pizza or smoothies. You can also find natural food stores, tattoo shops, and fruit and vegetable stands.

The annual “Kensington Market Festival of Lights”, which is now known as the Kensington Market Winter Solstice Festival, is celebrated as a parade on the streets of Kensington Market during the Winter Solstice in December. This carnival parade of giant puppets, firebreathers, stiltwalkers and samba musicians was created and founded by Ida Carnevali in 1987 as a way of beckoning the return of the sun on the longest night of the year. Artists and groups such as the Samba Squad, Shadowland Theatre, Clay & Paper Theatre, Richard Underhill, the Befana Choir and the Kensington Horns participate in this event. For many years, the parade ended in a post-sunset concert and spectacle in Bellevue Square; since 2009, the parade has ended at Alexandra Park to handle the larger crowd.

The Pedestrian Sundays festival is a car-free festival where the streets close to cars in several Sundays in the summer. The festival ran for five years, attracting many people to party on the streets of Kensington Market, including bands, street foods, etc.

Bellevue Square Park hosts many concerts and festivals throughout late spring and summer. In addition, the Chiaroscuro Reading Series is held the second Tuesday of each month at Augusta House. Prominent science fiction, fantasy, and horror authors offer readings of their works.